elf: Silhoette of autumn scene; one glitch sitting on a park bench, another leaping in the air (Glitch - Autumn Day)
[personal profile] elf
This gets interesting, because "reminds me of summertime" often has nothing to do with the contents of the song. I spent a good portion of my preteen and early teen summers in Arkansas, so there are a swarm of country & bluegrass songs that I think of as "summery" because that's when I heard them. But those aren't the only ones I think of as "summertime" songs.

Cotton Jenny | I'm Gonna Hire a Wino | Out of the Frying Pan (And into the Fire) | Delta Dawn | Lady Takes the Cowboy Every Time | Cruel Summer | Stay Young | Good Vibrations | Nobody | Boys of Summer

And one I associate with summer both because of how I first heard it and the contents )Meme list

Bed at 4:30am again.

Jun. 24th, 2017 08:24 pm
archangelbeth: Bleary-eyed young woman peers up, pillow obscuring the lower half of her face. Text reads: SO not a morning person. (So Not A Morning Person)
[personal profile] archangelbeth
*sigh*

Reminding ze spouse that the kid gets the Benadryl AFTER tooth-brushing, not before, so the peak woozytime does not have to be worked through in order to get teeth brushed. -_-

The sky was a weird grayblue, and very very foggy. I wiped at the bathroom window to see if it was somehow condensation, but if it was, it was on the other side. Blurry atmospheric picture was taken. https://twitter.com/emccoy_writer/status/878531036795330561

So, obviously, breakfast was at 3pm. -_-

Havva Quote
----------------------Quoted by BotEl-----------------------
Marianne, Ofanite of the Wind
Corporeal: 4 Ethereal: 3 Celestial: 2
Strength: 5 Intellect: 5 Will: 3
Agility: 11 Precision: 7 Perception: 5
Skills: Acrobatics/3, Area Knowledge (England)/3, Fast-Talk/2, Language (Local)/3, Running/2
Attunements: Ofanite of the Wind, Cherub of the Wind, Elohite of the Wind
Remaining CP: 6
------------------------------------------------------------
E**** says, “Cheers, love, the cavalry's here!”
--From the MUSH



INwatch+Bookwatch )

Dragons under fold )
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
Took Finn to the groomer again. I like for him to look like people love him.

Last time, they just had to shave it all off. There wasn't much choice, and so they didn't ask what I wanted. I get that. This time they did ask. "Do you want him to look like a poodle?" "Isn't he already a poodle?"

Yes, but now he looks more like a poodle. I didn't think it was possible.

I've been amusing myself and occasionally annoying everybody else by crooning "You are so poodle-ful to meeeeeee" at him ever since.

*************************************************************


Why the Amish Are Building America’s RVs

To Remember Random Errands, Turn Them Into a Story

Teenage boy from Mumbai slum dances way to NY ballet school

A Serbian Farmer Wants To Protect The Balkan Donkey By Selling Its Pricey Milk

I am Lionfish, hear me ROAR!

Ramadan? There's an app for that.

The Once-Common Practice of Communal Sleeping

What Mormon Family Trees Tell Us About Cancer

America’s hungriest wind and solar power users: big companies

The unsustainable whiteness of green

Teens Are Having Sex Later, Using Contraception, CDC Finds

11 Ways That I, a White Man, Am Not Privileged (just read it)

How Europe could be the unexpected beneficiary of America’s fall from global grace

FEMA Is Preparing for a Solar Superstorm That Would Take Down the Grid

Turkish schools to stop teaching evolution, official says

Some U.S. States Relax Restrictions On Cladding Suspected In Grenfell Tower Fire

When twisted justice stops prisoners from starting over

A New, New Right Rises in Germany

Kurds see chance to advance their cause in ruins of Islamic State

America’s cultural divide runs deep. While rural and urban Americans share some economic challenges, they frequently diverge on questions of culture and values. On few issues are they more at odds than immigration.

How Accusing A Powerful Man of Rape Drove A College Student To Suicide

The Silence of the Lambs (This article is about child rape.)

As women go to jail in record numbers, who's watching out for their kids? No one.

Politics )

(no subject)

Jun. 24th, 2017 05:08 pm
skygiants: Jadzia Dax lounging expansively by a big space window (daxanova)
[personal profile] skygiants
Our adventures with Star Wars: The Clone Wars continue! Though, alas, those of many of our clone buddies do not.

Episodes 11-20 of Season 1 under the cut )

Huh. So that happened.

Jun. 24th, 2017 03:58 pm
klgaffney: Lightning at night striking the far shore over otherwise calm water. (lightning on the bay.)
[personal profile] klgaffney
Apparently I missed a 'wind event' (it was a small tornado), touching down briefly (video has a nsfw warning for a rather excited gent fluent in NJ's favorite words) at the Home Depot store just 2 miles down the road from us.

W said he woke up to the emergency alert on his cell, but supposedly my response was to mumble something about 'having already done talked to the North Wind last night, *hand-wave-gesture* and it's fine,' upon which I went back to sleep. When I woke up properly it was in fact, fine, I had no idea the storm was that severe, or that it had done anything else other than rain a bit. It had been a clear starry night when I went to bed, and when I woke up, the rain was stopping and nothing in the yard was disturbed.

The passing low-pressure thingy probably contributed a lot to me being a miserable non-verbal cuss this morning though. I never considered it because I'd completely missed the thing.
sovay: (Sydney Carton)
[personal profile] sovay
So I tried InspiroBot, the random generator of inspirational quotes that is going through my Facebook friendlist like surrealist wildfire. I think I lost:



As [personal profile] handful_ofdust says encouragingly, "One can try!"

I've learned that my short story "The Trinitite Golem" (Clockwork Phoenix #5) has received honorable mentions in both Gardner Dozois' The Year's Best Science Fiction: Thirty-Fourth Annual Collection and Helen Marshall and Michael Kelly's The Year's Best Weird Fiction, Volume 4, neither of which I was expecting and both of which I am happy about.

Having been out of touch with Badass of the Week for some years, I am very grateful to have been pointed toward their entry for Joe Beyrle. "I shouldn't have to go around reminding you that 'Nazi Punks Fuck Off' is pretty much the only phrase in recorded history that Captain America, George S. Patton, and The Dead Kennedys have ever completely agreed upon without even the slightest bit of argument—so clearly there has to be something tangible behind that sentiment."

I don't know what you call this kind of photoset illustration of a piece of poetry, but I really like it.
dreamwriteremmy: Alexis Bledel, a brunette smiling sitting on a bench (Default)
[personal profile] dreamwriteremmy
Thurs Dec 22nd: What is one skill you want to upgrade or learn in 2017? (Gwynne Michele's FB Post)

Voice stuff on two levels:

(1) It'd be really nice to be able to video blog/voice record without having to have the microphone gain and volume set up all the way to capture front voice and the enunciation.

(2) singing.

December Blogging Meme Masterpost (LJ)

Science articles

Jun. 24th, 2017 01:30 pm
conuly: (Default)
[personal profile] conuly
So, went out to walk the dogs earlier. Everything was going great, until Moonpie found a patch of grass. It looked to me to be identical to all the other patches of grass, but not to her....

Moonpie: YAY! Grass!
Me: C'mon, we're on our way home now!
Moonpie: Sure, sure, but hold on, I gotta roll around here.
Me: C'mon!
Moonpie: Busy flopping around like a dead fish!
Me: Indeed, you are.
Moonpie: LIKE A DEAD FISH!!!!
Finn: Smells good. Maybe I should take a leak.
Moonpie: LIKE A DEAD FISH!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

We did eventually get home, where I found out that when Eva agreed to take out the compost for me in exchange for $7, she actually just dumped it on the ground sort of near the compost bin instead of actually in the bin. She's not getting her $7, and I don't care what she says, that's plenty fair.

**********************


While trust is inherited, distrust is not: study

Massive, ‘Dead’ Galaxy Puzzles Astronomers

Bioengineers create more durable, versatile wearable for diabetes monitoring

Legal or not, more American women are opting for abortion by medication. We asked doctors: How safe is it?

Self-folding origami: Chemical programming allows Nafion sheets to fold and refold

A Better Touch Screen, Inspired by Moth Eyes

Scientists spy on the secret inner life of bacteria

Sea sponges stay put with anchors that bend but don't break

Some clouds are full of little lollipop-shaped ice crystals

How did bird babysitting co-ops evolve?

Why Do Bird Eggs Come in So Many Shapes?

Saying 'climate change' instead of 'global warming' decreases partisan gap by 30 percent in U.S.

Wave beams mix and stir the ocean to create climate

Are you forgetful? That's just your brain erasing useless memories

Cancer cells may streamline their genomes in order to proliferate more easily

This glass frog wears its heart for all to see

How a wildfire kicked up a 45,000-foot column of flames

A 100-year-old physics problem has been solved
snickfic: (Default)
[personal profile] snickfic posting in [community profile] thisfinecrew
I found out about this via the League of Women Voters. This act, introduced in both the Senate and the House, has the stated purpose "To require States to automatically register eligible voters to vote in elections for Federal office, and for other purposes."

Among other things, it would automatically register eligible voters via information they provide to various government offices, such as the DMV. A number of states have take this kind of legislation up, and a few have passed it, but it would be wonderful to have this on a federal level, for all states.

It's S. 1353 in the Senate and H.R. 2876 in the House. Call your reps and ask them to support this act by co-sponsoring it.

What we're seeing right now in Washington with the AHCA is what happens when the elected officials are not sensitive to the needs of their constituents. To force them to care, we have to make it easier for those constituents to make their voices heard in the voting booth.

(no subject)

Jun. 24th, 2017 01:42 pm
the_rck: (Default)
[personal profile] the_rck
Cordelia is now saying that she doesn't want to go to camp in August because she doesn't think she can handle a week without me. She also says that she's sure all of the other kids will be awful people and that there will be so many people present that there's no hope of her managing to spend any time with the people she actually knows.

She's been wanting lots of hugs and cuddling and reassurance that I'll always be there for her. She's also afraid any time she lets herself stop and think (mostly in the evenings). Her days have been pretty full, but she comes home and tells me that, even though she had fun, she missed me horribly. I think she's got some sort of worry that, if she's not checking up on me regularly, I'll just vanish.

I finally listened to the voicemail Cordelia's psychiatrist left. She says that the Celexa ought to stay at a steady level for twenty four hours on a single dose and that this may mean the dose is too low. Cordelia is afraid of upping the dose because she's connected her tiredness to the medication. I need to call the doctor back on Monday to discuss it.

Cordelia has more or less mastered swallowing small pills. Last night, she asked what I take for cramps, and I gave her a naproxen. It took her two swallows to get it down, but she did, and she was astonished to discover that it did help.

Her report card came today. It's all A's with an A+ in gym and an A- in algebra. Cordelia's of the opinion that they can't have counted the algebra final in that grade because she thinks that would have taken her down to B+ or even B range. I can't tell from PowerSchool whether or not she's right. It doesn't actually matter. B grades are good, too, and that particular class has been nasty for all the students due to the teacher not being very good.

Bruria Kaufman

Jun. 24th, 2017 04:53 pm
[syndicated profile] languagelog_feed

Posted by Mark Liberman

The Annual Reviews have a tradition of featuring retrospective articles by or about senior figures, and the Annual Review of Linguistics has followed this pattern with pieces featuring Morris Halle in the 2016 volume and Bill Labov in 2017. For 2018, we’ll be featuring Lila Gleitman.

As background, Barbara Partee, Cynthia McLemore and I spent the last couple of days interviewing Lila about her life and work. We’ve got more than 7.5 hours of recordings, which is more like a book than an article — and it may very well turn into a book as well, with edited interview material interspersed with reprints of Lila’s papers. But what I want to post about today is one of the many things that I learned in the course of the discussions. This was just a footnote in Lila’s life story, but it has its own intrinsic interest, and I’m hoping that some readers will be able to provide more information.

I learned that the founder of the Penn Linguistics Department, Zellig Harris, was married to a mathematical physicist named Bruria Kaufman. She worked with John von Neumann, wrote some widely-cited papers on crystal statistics in the late 1940s, published with Albert Einstein (Albert Einstein and Bruria Kaufman. “A new form of the general relativistic field equations“, Annals of Mathematics, 1955), and later wrote papers like “Unitary symmetry of oscillators and the Talmi transformation“, Journal of Mathematical Physics 1965, and “Special functions of mathematical physics from the viewpoint of Lie algebra“, Journal of Mathematical Physics 1966.

The thing that interested me most was that Bruria Kaufman also worked for a while in the 1950s with Harris at Penn, at the same time as others including Lila Gleitman, Aravind Joshi, R.B. Lees, Naomi Sager, Zeno Vendler, and Noam Chomsky. And according to this 1961 NSF report, her contributions included Transformations and Discourse Analysis Papers (TDAP) numbers 19 and 20:

19. Higher-order Substrings and Well-formedness, Bruria Kaufman.
20. Iterative Computation of String Nesting (Fortran Code), Bruria Kaufman.

I’ve found a couple of citations to these works, but so far not the works themselves.

The 1961 NSF report says that

Paper 15 gives an information [sic — should be informal?] presentation of a general theory and method for syntactic recognition. Papers 16-19 give the actual flow charts of each section of the syntactic analysis program.

where 15-19 are

15. Computable Syntactic Analysis, Zellig S. Harris. (Revised version published as PoFL I, above)
16. Word and Word-Complex Dictionaries, Lila Gleitman.
17. Elimination of Alternative Classifications, Naomi Sager.
18. Recognition of Local Substrings, Aravind K. Joshi.
19. Higher-order Substrings and Well-formedness, Bruria Kaufman.

and “PoFL I” is Harris’s String Analysis and Sentence Structure, 1962.

Aravind Joshi and Phil Hopely, “A parser from antiquity“, Natural Language Engineering 1996, explains that

A parsing program was designed and implemented at the University of Pennsylvania during the period from June 1958 to July 1959. This program was part of the Transformations and Discourse Analysis Project (TDAP) directed by Zellig S. Harris. The techniques used in this program, besides being influenced by the particular linguistic theory, arose out of the need to deal with the extremely limited computational resources available at that time. The program was essentially a cascade of finite state transducers (FSTs).

More on the history from that source:

The original program was implemented in the assembly language on Univac 1, a single user machine. The machine had acoustic (mercury) delay line memory of 1000 words. Each word was 12 characters/digits, each character/digit was 6 bits. Lila Gleitman, Aravind Joshi, Bruria Kauffman, and Naomi Sager and a little later, Carol Chomsky were involved in the development and implementation of this program. A brief description of the program appears in Joshi 1961 and a somewhat generalized description of the grammar appears in Harris 1962.  This program is the precursor of the string grammar program of Naomi Sager at NYU, leading up to the current parsers of Ralph Grishman (NYU) and Lynette Hirschman (formerly at UNISYS, now at Mitre Corporation). Carol Chomsky took the program to MIT and it was used in the question-answer program of Green, BASEBALL (1961). At Penn, it led to a program for transformational analysis (kernels and transformations) (1963) and, in many ways, influenced the formal work on string adjunction (1972) and later tree-adjunction (1975).

The paper’s bibliography cites

Transformations and Discourse Analysis Project (TDAP) Reports, University of Pennsylvania, Reports #15 through #19, 1959-60. Available in the Library of the National Institute of Science and Technology (NIST) (formerly known as the National Bureau of Standards (NBS)), Bethesda, MD.

So I’ll ask my friends at NIST if these works are still there.

 

(no subject)

Jun. 24th, 2017 01:24 pm
the_rck: (Default)
[personal profile] the_rck
I wrote a lot yesterday, a bit more than 2300 words. I find that amazing given that I spent most of the day in a groggy haze, trying to figure out whether or not I had a window for napping.

Scott had to work 3 a.m. to 7 a.m. today. We got a call from the shift supervisor about half an hour after Scott went to bed. The guy wanted to make sure Scott knew he had to come in. He kept stumbling over what he was saying and talking in circles. I'm pretty sure that he had a script in mind for the call and that I blew it up by saying that Scott was in bed and couldn't come to the phone. Scott identified the caller simply based on my description of the guy's confusion.

I ended up staying up a bit later than I meant to because the writing was working well. For some reason, just the thought of needing to go to bed makes me able to produce words and plot and all of that. I think I slept a solid eight hours once I did go to bed, so there's that. I kind of want to go back to bed, though.

Scott has Monday scheduled off because it's our anniversary. I have a couple of minor errands that will be much easier if someone gives me a ride, so we'll deal with those. The rest of the day is ours. Cordelia is now saying that Scott and I should celebrate however we want, including without her, because it's our day. (She said something on the order of "I wasn't involved in your wedding.") This is a change from years past. I don't know that we'll leave her at home, but it's nice that, if we did, she'd be okay with it.
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